Fried Sweet Corn

 Pearly white – better than gold

As the first few days of June arrived, my teeth started clattering, almost chopping at the bits. You see, it’s the start the Silver corn crops coming in. First, the Silver King followed with the Silver Queen, which if we are lucky, will last through mid summer.

Now I’ve gotten by the last month or so with the sweet white corn coming in from south Florida but, sorry my Floridian friends, it just doesn’t compare. One of summer’s greatest pleasures, Silver Queen has perfect rows of crisp kernels, thin hulls packed full of milky sweetness and almost good eaten raw as it is cooked. Silver King is as the name implies, larger and is disease resistance making it a better crop in our humid area. Nevertheless, there are still many farmers that prefer planting Silver Queen and I thank them for it. I’m planning on a bushel or two.

Grandmother told me to get them early in the morning, get to shucking as soon as possible removing the tassels and if you’re planning on freezing it, blanch the ears in boiling water for a few minutes. Remove and place the ears in tubs of ice water to stop the cooking process and then, you can place them in freezer bags. You’ll then have corn on the cob ready in the winter months. If you want to cut the kernels from the cob to freeze, do it with a sharp knife cutting downward the length of the cob running the blade as close to the cob as possible. Be careful not to cut into the cob. Some folks use a hand cutter and creamer specifically made for this job. Be sure to scrape down the cob to get all that loving milk from the cob. Seal it in a freezer bag and that’s all there is to it.

Of course, there’s nothing like fresh, off the cob simmered corn, and that’s what today’s recipe is about. Pure summer heaven if you ask me. Enjoy!

Grandmother’s Fried Corn

2 tablespoons bacon grease or butter
4 to 6 ears silver queen corn
1/4 cup heavy cream
1/4 cup sweet milk
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper

    In a bowl, slice corn halfway through the kernel down the length of the cob. Using the back of the knife, scrape the cobs removing the rest of the corn and its milk. Heat a large skillet, add the grease and add the corn, salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer and slowly add the cream and milk bringing back to a boil. Reduce heat, stir to prevent sticking and cook until done adding more milk if needed. Add butter if desired.

    TIP: Buy corn as fresh as possible preferably the day of picking. The longer it hangs around, the starchier it will get. Older corn is good to use in dishes like fried corn but you won’t get as much natural milk from the ears of corn.

    12 thoughts on “Fried Sweet Corn

    1. pegasuslegend

      hmm guess I will have to see if I could find that one by name….I usually love to grow corn but at this house here in Florida no room as you need fields lol…. this corn looks fabulous, and I am sure it is very sweet just looking at it, my mom used to put milk and sugar in the water while boiling to add sweetness frying this must be an awesome cream corn yum~

      Reply
    2. Lana @ Never Enough Thyme

      Drick – these last few recipes of yours have been the ultimate in southern summer time eating. I agree with you that the Silver Queen is the absolute best though Silver King runs a close second. Lovely, tender, milky corn that is just delicious. Keep those great recipes coming!

      Reply
    3. Chef Dennis

      your granmother was right about corn, and how could anyone go wrong with bacon grease or butter…..sigh….how I do miss the days before we knew about cholesterol!!

      Reply
    4. bunkycooks

      I love corn cooked like this. It is soooo good. I do something similar, but different, so as soon as the corn is good here, I will do a post. See what you think of my old recipe! 🙂

      Reply

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